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Wednesday, August 17, 2011

¿WHY AREN'T AMERICANS MOVING?









Polls consistently show that fewer than
half of Americans approve
 of the job that President Obama is
doing, and those ratings are far higher than Congress or either political party
receives. Unemployment remains stubbornly above 9 percent. There is plenty
of anger in America today: anger about joblessness across the nation, about
cutbacks in services in the states, about increased tuition at our
universities, about economic and political inequality that seems to be
increasing, and at a government that seems unable
to do anything
 about any of this.
Where are the people taking to the streets?









The closest thing to a strong
social movement in the United States in recent years has been the tea party,
and it demands that government do less. Lately, we hear about the tea party
largely from members of Congress and candidates for office, who have drowned
out and replaced the activists at the grass roots. This is largely because
although movements carry anger, anger doesn’t make a movement — organizers do.
Anger helps, of course; it’s a resource that organizers can stoke, channel and
exploit.







Although saints and psychopaths
will take great risks in the service of their beliefs, most people are a little
more calculating. People protest when they believe that something is wrong,
that it could be otherwise, and that their efforts are both necessary and potentially
effective. SO WHY AREN’T AMERICANS
MOVING?





REVIEW OF THE HELP













It has been forever since my last review and I am elated that the movie I am returning to, is the Help.





Set in Jackson, Mississippi, in the 1960s, the Help explores the issues of  civil rights and poverty through the lives and eyes of black maids in the heart of the Jim Crow- a strong female cast brings a fresh perspective to these issues.





It stars Emma Stone as Skeeter, the daughter of a prominent family, who has just graduated from Ole Miss, somewhat rebellious, and unlike other young women in Jackson, isn't too concerned with the ''trappings'' of marriage and motherhood. Skeeter is rather indignant at the level of racism she observes, largely due to the fact that the woman who raised and cared for her was a black maid. Skeeter devises a plan -one that is very daring and dangerous to have these maids tell their stories and have them published in a book.





 In an effort to accomplish these,she convinces Abilene (Viola Davis) and Milly (Octavia Spencer) and eventually many of others to recount their experiences.








What's Good about the movie:





Superb acting from an amazing cast. Viola was excellent and delivered a magnificent performance- i sense oscar nom. She was totally captivating and every emotion was clearly felt and conveyed and one couldn't tell where Abilene ended and Viola began.





Other good performances were also delivered by Emma Stone and Octavia Spencer.








What's Bad about the movie:





Though it was well written and well acted, it felt as if the creative forces played it a bit safe and it turned out to be somewhat predictable.





I also felt like there was more they could have done with Milly (Octavia Spencer) to show a bit more range. She was very present during her scenes but was a bit too one dimensional.





Overall Grade: A, a very moving and emotional film that is definitely worth seeing.






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